Another Day...


Whether it’s in the untimely ending of a life barely begun; or at the funeral of a beloved husband and father ‘gone-too-soon’; or at the bedside of a mother desperately clinging to life through years of suffering – we feel the pain of our mortality, the curse of death.

As much as I have appreciated travelling alongside McKinley through Jesus’ final day on earth, it is what happens after that day which caps the journey.

The empty tomb is the ‘reset’ button of my life - and the life of every believer.  The ‘death of death’ is our only hope, our only comfort and our only joy when mortality looms.

Because Jesus rose from the dead, we can cry out with the apostle Paul,

“O death, where is your victory?  O death, where is your sting?”
1 Corinthians 15:55

The last chapter of ‘Passion’ is fittingly called ‘Another Day’. 

But because of the resurrection, Jesus’ final day wasn’t really His final day.  Jesus has no final day – there is always another to enjoy.  And for those of us who are trusting in Him, our death isn’t our last day either! (p.147)

I first heard this hymn at the funeral of a dear brother in Christ.  It remains a favourite of mine – the words of the chorus particularly sweet.  Jesus’ resurrection is why this hymn is our song.

It is not death to die
To leave this weary road
And join the saints who dwell on high 
Who’ve found their home with God
It is not death to close
The eyes long dimmed by tears
And wake in joy before Your throne 
Delivered from our fears

CHORUS 
O Jesus, conquering the grave
Your precious blood has power to save 
Those who trust in You
Will in Your mercy find
That it is not death to die

It is not death to fling 
Aside this earthly dust
And rise with strong and noble wing 
To live among the just
It is not death to hear
The key unlock the door
That sets us free from mortal years 
To praise You evermore

CHORUS 
O Jesus, conquering the grave
Your precious blood has power to save 
Those who trust in You
Will in Your mercy find
That it is not death to die

Original words by H. A. Cé­sar Ma­lan, 1832 (Non, ce n’est pas mour­ir que d’al­ler vers son Dieu).  
Additional words and melody by Bob Kauflin, 2008